How to pack for travelling

Australia travel blogger kangaroo sanctuary
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia
How to pack for a working holiday in australia

My friends laughed at me when I told them I had bought suitcase organisers. "What the hell are they?" was the general response. Well, after living out of my suitcase for almost five months I can honestly say they have been one of the best investments of my life.

Before you judge, we decided against backpacks for a reason. I like to be able to roll my luggage where possible (diva) and I'd heard the terrain along the East Coast of Australia does not require a backpack as it's all quite flat and accessible.

So four months, three flights, one eleven hour train journey, lots of hostels lacking lifts and about 15 Greyhound bus journeys later – am I finding this to have been a good decision or a terrible one?

Personally, I think packing in this way with this type of suitcase was definitely the best and most convenient option, for me at least (a 5'3" girl with an inability to lift things). For my friend, Rach, who is now on to her second broken suitcase, perhaps not. But she has been very unlucky, so while I think you probably should invest in a suitcase with certain features (which I got told by the suitcase experts at Dalton Park, and will go into below) you really shouldn't worry too much about it all going wrong. Do bear in mind that dragging a case up a few flights of stairs isn't the most fun but I can't imagine carrying a 20kg backpack up multiple flights of stairs would be a ball either. Plus, if you just ensure you're outwardly expressing your struggle a strong male will probably offer to help. 

I've also loved the suitcase organisers. It's honestly so much easier to live out of a suitcase when you have what are basically see-through drawers and you know the location of each item cos it's always in the same place. Bloody brilliant invention, as Ron Weasley would say.


So, what to look for in your suitcase:

  •  Four wheels – makes life easier. But remember to use all four wheels where possible, cos it's not designed to take the weight on two wheels and this is one thing that could lead to the tragic sitch of the broken wheel.

  • Hard shell. Rach's first case was a soft shell, and we think the lack of even weight distribution this lead to may have been a factor in the breakage.

  •  Leading on from the previous point, evenly sized sections on each sides of the suitcase (which you naturally get with most hard shell cases).

  • A bright colour so you can easily distinguish it. You'll appreciate this when it's 2am, your bus has just pulled up to a new town and you are trying to identify your case among 20 others in the bus storage.

Essentials to pack in the suitcase:

  • A travel towel. A microfibre towel rolls up really, really small, dries easily and is generally such a good idea for any form of travelling. Hostels do not provide towels btw. Mine is from Craghoppers and was about £10 from an outdoor outlet store (Dalton Park again lols).

  • A sleeping bag liner. Admittedly I haven't used it that much because Australian hostels do tend to be quite clean, however a few of them have a lot of bugs (I slept in it in Airlie Beach because our room had a cockroach infestation and I just wanted to be in a sealed environment). Ooh and it also came in useful when we camped ('glamped') on Fraser Island because it was hot enough to use this as a sleeping bag so I didn't have to buy or rent one. Mine was also by Craghoppers from the Dalton Park outlet store.

  • SUITCASE ORGANISERS. I feel like I've said enough about this one. Just buy them, Separate your swimwear from your casual clothing and your dresses, roll them all up as demonstrated by my very thorough photography and enjoy the thrill of organisation. Head to Amazon for the best selection.

  • A portable charger. My phone literally dies after about three hours of use and while this wasn't too much of an issue for me while travelling the coast because there was barely any wifi so I didn't use it much anyway, it became quite the annoyance when settling down a bit in cities and actually having data etc/the need to use my phone to job hunt. Also a few hostels don't have sockets near your bed so if you need to sleep next to your phone this can be a great solution.

  • Plastic bags for shoes – cheap and cheerful advice here. Who wants to put their muddy trainers back among their clothes after a hike? Not me thanks. Plastic bags or shower caps are excellent for this. Or actual shoe bags if you wanna do it the posh way.

  • A pill box for jewellery. It will keep your necklaces separate and untangled, your rings safe and easy to find... Such a good idea c/o my mum.

  • Finally, the carry-on bag essentials I would recommend would be earplugs, an eye mask (I can't use them because my eyes feel claustrophobic but if you can they're probably super helpful for staying in hostels with strangers/sleeping on transport and what not), a water bottle – if you don't mind tap water, there are taps in most public spaces in Oz so refilling your own bottle will save you so much money.


This is probably everything I would recommend I think, if you have any questions/think there's something I've not covered please do ask!

 I hope someone looking to travel actually reads this because otherwise it has been a pretty pointless post hasn't it. Although to be fair if you just want to pack better for your holiday there's probably a lot of relevant advice for that too.

Anyway, thanks for reading! xxx


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